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Hardware

Assess Your Tech: Why Nonprofits Need Technology Assessments

By: Chris Peters

This article was adapted from TechSoup's MaintainIT Project, an effort funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to gather and distribute stories around maintaining and supporting public computers. Originally published September 22, 2009, this article was updated September 18, 2014 to remove old links and outdated sections.

How Providing Access to Technology Helps the John Howard Society of Durham Region Connect with their Community

John Howard Society of Durham Region ThumbnailIt’s easy to assume everyone has access to the Internet in a first-world country like Canada, but in reality 17 per cent of Canadian households don’t have internet at home – including 58 per cent of households with incomes of $30 000 or less.

That’s millions of Canadians falling behind in the digital age where almost every aspect of our lives is tied to the Internet, including a vital one: employment.

5 Signs You Have Outgrown Your Current Software

Though many small nonprofits can justify the cost of tangible work-related expenses like furniture and office supplies, many find it harder to justify spending money on new software. Unfortunately, clinging to outdated software can potentially cost you thousands of dollars in the long run by causing your operations to be inefficient and unproductive, putting you at a disadvantage before you’ve even engaged with future donors and supporters.

Unified Communications Options for Nonprofits

Unified communications (UC) is a popular buzzword, but its broad usage makes it difficult to define. Generally, UC refers to a large family of technologies and organizational practices that simplify and integrate multiple forms of communications like phone conversations, email, video and web conferencing, instant messaging (IM), voicemail, fax, and SMS messages. Can UC improve the way your organization communicates?

Accidental Techie: Do I have a 32 or 64 bit system? How can I find out?

One of the most common questions I run into is "will this program run on my system?" I thought I'd take a minute to explain how to check what kind of system you have, and explain how the 32-bit and 64-bit systems are different.

First of all, let's find out what kind of system you have!

Ten Tips for Donating a Computer

How to donate your used equipment

By: Jim Lynch and Ariel Gilbert-Knight

October 18, 2011

Tips for Buying Refurbished Computers

While nonprofits may hold on to hardware equipment until the last bit of life has been squeezed out of it, many corporations abandon working computers in good condition after just three or four years of use. While this equipment may be outdated for the bleeding-edge needs of a large enterprise, that doesn't mean that it doesn't have years of life that it can offer your organization — especially when its components have been examined and updated by a professional refurbisher.

Six Tips for Accepting (and Refusing!) Donated Equipment

Suggestions for taking or leaving free hardware

By: Jim Lynch

April 12, 2006

Editor's note: This article was written for a US audience, so not all of the information will apply in Canada

How to Get Long Life Out of Laptop and Cell Phone Batteries

This post originally appeared on techsoup.org's blog and was written by Jim Lynch, Co-Director of TechSoup's GreenTech program.

Networking 101: Understanding Your Needs and Options

A roadmap to networking options for nonprofits and libraries

This article was adapted from TechSoup

By: Chris Peters

February 8, 2011